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Elephant in the room – LGBTQ+ Youth Support


Event Details


Join BLOOM365 for our quarterly Elephant in the Room Community Conversation. We will engage in dialogue to enhance individual and collective efforts to prevent the victimization of LGBTQ youth and gain new skills to support LGBTQ+ youth survivors competently and inclusively.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?:

Parents/Caregivers | School Personnel | Community Partners | School Resource Officers | Youth Counselors | Youth Victim Service Providers | Youth Development Staff | Trusted Adults Who Interact With Youth

THE NEED FOR THIS CONVERSATION:

LGBTQ Youth who have witnessed or experienced teen dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and/or gender-based violence face unique and significant barriers to seeking help.

The 2013 National School Climate Survey found that 59.5% of LGBTQ students said they felt unsafe in school because of their sexual orientation.

Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) youth are more likely to experience physical and psychological dating abuse, sexual coercion and cyber dating abuse than their heterosexual peers. Dank, M., Lachman, P., Zweig, J. M., & Yahner, J. (2014). Dating violence experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth. Journal of youth and adolescence, 43(5), 846­857.

A 2011 national study found that the combination of anti­transgender bias and persistent, structural racism was especially devastating, further highlighting the need to approach care from an intersectional** framework. Harrison­Quintana, J., Quach, C., & Grant, J. Injustice at Every Turn: A look at multiracial respondents in the National Transgender Discrimination Survey. Retrieved on September 24, 2015, from http://www.thetaskforce.org/static_html/downloads/reports/reports/ntds_multiracial_respondents.pdf.

Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) high school students are 4 times more likely, and questioning youth are 3 times more likely, to attempt suicide as their heterosexual peers. Centers for Disease Control. (2011). Sexual Identity, Sex of Sexual Contacts, and Health­Risk Behaviors Among Students in Grades 9­12: Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.